A Luminous Sorrow
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putthison:

Actual Japanese Workwear

Check out these absolutely stunning Japanese firemen coats. Known as Hanten coats, these were worn by Japanese firefighters in the 19th century. At the time, the technology to spray water at a high-enough pressure hadn’t been invented yet, so Japanese men had to fight fires by creating firebreaks downwind. Doing so, however, put them in danger of catching on fire themselves, as hot embers can travel up to a mile. To prevent that, they were continually doused with water, so that the thick and heavy coats would be more fire resistant.

The symbols and designs you see are for several things. Some are just for decoration, of course, while some signal the fire crew that the wearer belonged to. Others are lucky symbols, while some might refer to a heroic story or myth, encouraging the wearer to be courageous and strong.

You can see these coats in person (along with many other awesome things) at Shibui, a shop in New York City for Japanese antiques and collectibles. They’re moving at the end of September and are having a sale right now to lighten their load. Select items are discounted by up to 50%, including lots of boro fabrics, which is a kind of heavily patched and mended Japanese textile. You can see examples of boro here.

For those of us outside of NYC, Shibui has a Google+ page you can admire (they’ll take phone orders, if you’re interested). There’s also a book titled Haten and Happi, which is all about traditional Japanese work coats. 

Anonymous asked: will you join a religious order or society (even if not living in community)?

I am currently not contemplating or discerning life with any order or society, no.

drakes-diary:

Drake’s AW14 Lookbook
Photograph by Jonathan Daniel Pryce

drakes-diary:

Drake’s AW14 Lookbook

Photograph by Jonathan Daniel Pryce

rhymeswithrad:

Paul Fryer

Lucifer (Morning star), 2008

Anodized aluminum, silicon rubber cord,

wax work figure, feathers, concrete

this is the single most painfully beautiful thing I’ve ever seen in my entire life.

(Source: 2headedsnake, via emittelucem)

aesza:

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2 by ros_with_a_prince on Flickr.
Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2

aesza:

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2 by ros_with_a_prince on Flickr.

Brueghel, Jan t.e. - The Triumph of Death-detail#2

(via verilyisayuntothee)


Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

(Source: paintingses, via verilyisayuntothee)

chepiiillo:

Santa Maria de Nascente, Milan

chepiiillo:

Santa Maria de Nascente, Milan

(via eternalgothic)

They want victory and good news. U.S. Christianity is a market form of Christianity, for the most part. It’s all about identifying with a winner. That is why on Easter Sunday the churches are full but Good Friday they are empty. People will show up when the winner pops us. But don’t tell me about the main protagonist being treated like a political prisoner by the Roman Empire. Don’t tell me about a senseless death based on injustice. And certainly don’t tell me about the Saturday in which echoing Nietzsche, ‘God is dead.’

— Cornel West (via letlovemeetlove)

(via locusimperium)